Using the Interactive Fact Book

Main Content

Southern Illinois University's new Interactive Fact Book provides institutional data pertaining to students enrolled at SIU, as well as the faculty and staff who work here. Data found in SIU's Interactive Fact Book reflects information that was included previously in our printed Fact Book, the only difference being that this data is now available online through Tableau dashboards. Having this information available online allows you to interact with and analyze the data in a variety of meaningful ways. Additionally, you can view, download, and print the data in several formats including tables, spreadsheets, graphical representations, or a combination of these formats, which is called a Tableau "story."

If you have not used a Tableau dashboard before, we have included helpful tips below, as well as explanations of the Tableau features that are unique to individual dashboards.

Using the Information Icon

The Information Icon on the right side of each Tableau dashboard explains the information contained in the dashboard, and gives details on what the data does or does not include.

information-icon.gif

 

Browsing Tooltips

Tooltips provide extra information when you hover over a line of data.

browsing tooltips

 

Emphasizing Data

Emphasizing data allows you to focus on a specific subset within the view. This is useful when a view has several data points that are difficult to distinguish between. When clicked, the selected data points will remain in color, while all other data points will fade into the background. 

 

emphasizing-data-2.gif

 

Filtering Data

Use filters to narrow down the information included in your dashboard. Many of the Interactive Fact Book dashboards have several filter options. These filters range from colleges and semesters to gender and ethnicity. You can use just one or many filters to specify data that you want. The data drawn is displayed in one or more tables with correlated graphics.

filtering data

 

Viewing on Mobile Devices

Full Screen View is recommended for viewing dashboards on phones and tablets. To view Tableau on smaller, mobile devices, click the Full Screen button. This button displays the dashboard in a new window, in the largest possible format. To return to the original screen, close the window.

 full-screen-button.png

Full Screen View

The Full Screen button turns on Tableau's Full Screen View. When this button is clicked, the open dashboard is displayed in a new window, in its entirety, across the entire screen. To return to a smaller view of the dashboard, close the full-screen view by closing the window.

 full-screen-button.png

Reverting to Original Data

If you need to return to the dashboard's original settings, click the Revert button at the top of the dashboard. The filters and/or data reverts to the information established as the default for that dashboard. If you want to keep the information you generated, download or print it before clicking the Revert button. If you click Revert, all of the filters you set and the data generated using your selections will be lost.

Using the revert button

 

Downloading Results

To keep the data collected in a Tableau dashboard, you must either download and save the dashboard, or download and then print the data and/or graphics generated.

To download the information shown in a Tableau dashboard for onscreen viewing:

  1. Click the Download PDF button at the top of the dashboard. A formatting window opens.
  2. In the Include field, click the down arrow and choose This View.
  3. In the Scaling field, click the down arrow and select at most 1 page wide.
  4. In the Paper Size field, click the down arrow and select Letter.
  5. In the Orientation field, select Portrait or Landscape.
  6. Click the Create PDF button. A confirmation window opens.
  7. Click Download. The downloaded file is saved to the Download folder on your device.
  8. Open the PDF in your Download folder. Verify that the information is displayed correctly.

Downloading a report

 

Printing Reports in Table Form

Typically, Tableau dashboards present data in two ways: 1) in table or spreadsheet form, and 2) as a graphical representation. To print the data collected in a dashboard, you must first decide whether you want to print the data in a table/spreadsheet or as a graphic. Printing in each of these formats requires a separate action.

To download the information shown in a Tableau dashboard, and print the information as a table:

  1. Click the Download PDF button at the top of the dashboard. A formatting window opens.
  2. In the Include field, click the down arrow and choose Specific sheets from this dashboard. A row of icons appears.
  3. Choose the Table icon. If there is more than one table icon in the dashboard, you need to select which of the table icons to print. You can select one or all. For example, a dashboard with three different tables will have icons with names that all begin with "Table." Select them all to print the entire dashboard.
  4. In the Scaling field, click the down arrow and select at most 1 page wide.
  5. In the Paper Size field, click the down arrow and select Letter.
  6. In the Orientation field, select Portrait or Landscape.
  7. Click the Create PDF button. A confirmation window opens. 
  8. Click Download. The downloaded file is saved to the Download folder on your device under the generic dashboard name for the file.
  9. Open the PDF and verify that the table is formatted correctly.
  10. In the top left corner, select the Print icon

Printing a table

Printing Report Graphics

Typically, Tableau dashboards present data in two ways: 1) as a graphical representation, and 2) in table or spreadsheet form. To print the data collected in a dashboard, you must first decide whether you want to print the data as a graphic or in table form. Printing in each of these formats requires a separate action. To capture and save a graphic in Tableau we recommend using the Windows Snipping Tool (or the Mac equivalent below).

To save the graphic that represents the data in a Tableau dashboard:

  1. Center the graphic in the screen. If the graphic is larger than the screen, zoom out in your browser window so the entire graphic is visible.
  2. Open the Windows Snipping Tool. The Snipping Tool opens and freezes the contents visible in the window. 
  3. Choose New in the Snipping tool. By default, Rectangular Snip will be selected under Mode. This allows you to select a specific area to save.
  4. Position the Snipping Tool cross-hair on the outer most edge of the graphic and draw a box around the graphic. This is the area that will be "snipped."
  5. After the Snipping tool captures the image, click File in the upper left-hand corner of the snipping window.
  6. Choose Save As to name and store the graphic file where you choose.
  7. Open a Word Document and insert the image into the document. Format the image to be the size that you want. 
  8. Click File at the top left of the screen. 
  9. Click Print

Mac Alternatives to the Snipping Tool

For Mac users, these commands are similar to the Windows Snipping tool.

  • Use Command + Shift + 3: captures a screenshot of your entire screen.
  • Use Command + Shift + 4: turns the cursor into a crosshair, allowing you to select which portion of your screen you would like to capture.

Printing Report Graphics

 

Printing a Tableau "Story"

In Tableau, a story is a sequence of visualizations that work together to convey information. You can create stories to tell a data narrative, provide context, demonstrate how decisions relate to outcomes, or to simply make a compelling case. You can identify a Tableau story dashboard in several ways:

  • A story dashboard has several buttons in the center-top of the window. For example: 

story-buttons.PNG

  • In the Download window, the include field will offer story icons.

A Tableau story can be downloaded or printed as a single document that contains both the data tables and the graphics.

To download the information shown in a Tableau story, and print the information:

  1. Click the Download PDF button at the top of the dashboard. A formatting window opens.
  2. In the Include field, click the down arrow and choose Specific sheets from this dashboard. A Story icon appears.
  3. Choose the Story icon.
  4. In the Scaling field, click the down arrow and select at most 1 page wide.
  5. In the Paper Size field, click the down arrow and select Letter.
  6. In the Orientation field, select Portrait. Landscape formatting does not render a Tableau Story well.
  7. Click the Create PDF button. A confirmation window opens.
  8. Click Download. The downloaded file is saved to the Download folder on your device under the generic dashboard name for the file.
  9. Open the PDF from your Download folder and verify that the Story is formatted correctly.
  10. In the top right corner, select the Print icon. Select from the various print options.

Printing

 

Definitions of Terms Used

The purpose of this section is to define terms used in the Fact Book, and as they are used by the University.  Assisting the customer to understand the terms used in the tables and graphs is a primary objective.

BUDGET

General Revenue Funds are those funds established to receive the major portion of the tax revenues and to pay the regular operating and administrative expenses of most State agencies. (Source:  Comptroller's Uniform Statewide Accounting System-Procedure 09.10.20)

Educational Assistance Fund  is a "Special State Fund" established July 1, 1989 by the Illinois Income Tax Act.  This act establishes that a portion of the state income tax be provided as financial assistance to Elementary, Secondary, and Higher Education in the State of Illinois. (Source:  Comptroller's Uniform Statewide Accounting System-Procedure 09.10.20)

University Income Funds are those funds which receive revenues such as course-specific fees and tuition at State-supported institutions of higher education.  These funds are appropriated for the support, operation and improvement of State-supported colleges and universities. (Source:  Comptroller's Uniform Statewide Accounting System-Procedure 09.10.20)

University Wide Services are those operations provided centrally that function for the entire University system as opposed to one specific unit.

ENROLLMENTS 

Full-Time students are undergraduate students enrolled for 12 or more credit hours per semester and graduate students enrolled for 9 or more credit hours per semester.  This is the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) definition. (Source:  National Center for Education Statistics)

FTE (Full-Time Equivalent) is defined as an enrollment unit used to represent a student enrolled for a full course of study.  It is calculated by dividing total credit hours generated by 15 for undergraduate students and by 12 for a graduate student for a semester FTE.  This is the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) definition. (Source:  National Center for Education Statistics)

Headcount is defined as the count of each student enrolled for one or more courses taken in a semester on the 10th day of the semester’s start.

Non-degree Seeking student is identified as a student enrolled in courses for credit who is not recognized by the institution as seeking a degree or formal award. This is the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) definition.  (Source:  National Center for Education Statistics)

Non-persisting indicates a student who is no longer enrolled at Southern Illinois  University  Carbondale in  any program.  Furthermore, this term is used to identify a student who is enrolled in a fall semester of an academic year and does not return the following fall semester.

Undeclared/Unclassified student is identified as a student who has enrolled in instructional courses but has not been officially accepted into one of the institution's authorized degree programs.  This is the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) definition. (Source:  National Center for Education Statistics) 

FACULTY AND STAFF 

(Source:  NCES and U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2010 SOC Definitions)

Business and Financial Operations Occupations include business operations specialists; financial specialists. 

Community Service, Legal, Arts, and Media Occupations include counselors, social workers; lawyers and other legal support workers; arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations.  

Computer, Engineering, and Science Occupations include mathematical and science occupations; computer programmers; database administrators; architecture; engineering occupations.

Graduate Teaching Assistants assists faculty by performing teaching or teaching-related duties.

Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations include healthcare practitioners and technical occupations.

Librarians, Curators, and Archivists include museum technicians and conservators; librarians and library technicians;  audio-visual and multimedia collections specialists.

Management Occupations include top executives; advertising, marketing, promotions, public relations, and sales managers; operations specialties managers.

Natural Resources, Construction, and Maintenance Occupations include farming, fishing, and forestry occupations; construction and extraction occupations; installation, maintenance, and repair occupations.

Non-postsecondary Teaching Occupations include pre-school, primary, secondary, and special education school teachers; other teachers and instructors; other education, training, and library occupations.

Office and Administrative Support Occupations include financial clerks; information and record clerks; customer service representatives; library assistants, clerical; receptionists; dispatchers; postal service workers; secretaries and administrative assistants; statistical assistants.

Part-time Faculty include faculty with less than a 95 percent appointment at the University. 

Postsecondary Teachers are reported by the following functions: instruction, instruction combined with research and/or public service, research, and public service.

Production, Transportation, and Material Moving Occupations include food processing workers; computer control programmers and operators; printing workers; plant and system operators; air transportation workers; motor vehicle operators.

Sales and Related Occupations include retail sales workers; sales supervisors; telemarketers.

Service Occupations include healthcare support occupations; protective service occupations; food prep and serving-related occupations; building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations; personal care and service occupations.

OTHER

CIP or Classification of Instructional Programs Code is a taxonomic coding scheme for secondary and postsecondary instructional programs.  The CIP is the accepted Federal Government statistical standard on instructional program classifications and is used in a variety of education information surveys and databases.  This is the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Glossary of Terms.

CPI or Consumer Price Index is a measure of the average change in prices over time paid for food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and the other goods and services that people buy for day-to-day living.  The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics compiles this index.  (Source:  2008 HEPI, Commonfund Institute)

HEPI or Higher Education Price Index is a measure of the average relative level in the prices of a fixed market of goods and services purchased by colleges and universities.  Government agencies and industry provide data to compile this index.  (Source: 2008 HEPI, Commonfund Institute)

LAC Fees stands for “Legislative Audit Commission Guideline Fees.”  LAC fees are course specific fees or other revenue derived from instructional activities.  Examples of this type of fee include course specific fees, application fees, graduation fees, transcript fees, and library fines.

Student Credit Hour is a unit awarded a student for completing instruction of at least one hour per week  for  a  semester  (usually 15 weeks) or laboratory work of two to three hours per week for a semester.  Quarter credits and short courses are prorated according to the above standard. (Source:  Illinois Board of Higher Education)

Lower Division Students (undergraduate) is a student who has accumulated fewer than 60 semester credit hours (90 quarter credit hours) or the equivalent.  (Source:  Illinois Board of Higher Education)

Upper Division Students (undergraduate) is a student who has completed at least 60 semester credit hours (90 quarter credit hours) or an unclassified (irregular or special) student who has not been admitted to the graduate divison or to a professional college or school giving a post baccalaureate degree. (Source:  Illinois Board of Higher Education)

Graduate I Students (graduate) is a student holding a bona fide bachelor’s degree who has been admitted to the graduate division or to a professional school either as a candidate for a master’s degree, advanced degree or certificate, or as an unclassified graduate student. (Source:  Illinois Board of Higher Education)

Graduate II Students (graduate) is a student holding a bona fide master’s degree or an advanced certificate beyond the master’s degree who has been admitted to a doctoral program.  Also, a student holding a bona fide bachelor’s degree who has been formally admitted to a doctoral program and who has completed at least 30 semester credit hours toward the doctoral degree is considered a Graduate II student.  A Graduate II student can exist only in programs for which the institution offers an approved doctoral degree. (Source:  Illinois Board of Higher Education)

Race/ethnicity (old definition): Categories used to describe groups to which individuals belong, identify with, or belong in the eyes of the community. The categories do not denote scientific definitions of anthropological origins. A person may be counted in only one group. The groups used to categorize U.S. citizens, resident aliens, and other eligible noncitizens are as follows: American Indian/Alaska Native; Asian/Pacific Islander; Black, non-Hispanic; Hispanic; White, non-Hispanic. (Source:  National Center for Education Statistics) 

Race/ethnicity (new definition effective Fall 2010): Categories developed in 1997 by the Office of Management and Budget that are used to describe groups to which individuals belong, identify with, or belong in the eyes of the community. The categories do not denote scientific definitions of anthropological origins. The designations are used to categorize U.S. citizens, resident aliens, and other eligible noncitizens.

Individuals are asked to designate ethnicity as

Hispanic or Latino; or
Not Hispanic or Latino.

Second, individuals are asked to indicate all races that apply among the following:

American Indian or Alaska Native;
Asian;
Black or African American;
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander;
and White.
(Source: National Center for Education Statistics)

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